If every society gets the El Dorado myth it deserves, then I regret to inform you that director Theo Love’s Netflix documentary The Legend of Cocaine Island is probably ours. It’s a story of greed, unwarranted optimism and incredibly poor judgment, all in service of a get-rich-quick scheme that would’ve been absurd even if it hadn’t been highly illegal. And its hero is none other than “the world’s worst superhero,” local news headline ubiquity Florida Man.

Florida Man takes many forms; in Cocaine Island, he’s Rodney Hyden, the self-made owner of a construction company that once boasted 80 employees. He lives in Archer, a tiny city near the center of the state that an eloquent neighbor muses is “not the end of the world, but we can see it from here.” After many prosperous years, the economic meltdown of the late 2000s suddenly pushes Rodney and his family into seven-figure debt. In hopes of recovering, he does something that he now admits was extremely stupid: He hatches a plan to find, transport and sell $2 million worth of cocaine that Archer’s resident hippie, Julian, claims to have buried on the beach in Culebra, Puerto Rico years earlier.

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