By Steven Reinberg                HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Mom and dad may be key in curbing the epidemic of drowsy teens, a new study suggests.

American teens aren't getting enough sleep, which can lead to anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts. Sleepy teens also are more likely to get into car crashes and have a greater risk of being injured while playing sports.

The lack of sleep may be due to too much homework, too many extracurricular activities, too much caffeine, early school start times and too much screen time, researchers say.

But parents can play a pivotal role in helping their teens get the rest they need.

"Greater enforcement of parent-set bedtimes for teenagers aged 14 to 17 are associated with longer sleep duration," said study lead author Jack Peltz, who conducted the research while at the University of Rochester in New York. He is now an assistant professor of psychology at Daemen College in Amherst, N.Y.

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