A tiny dot in the English Channel off the coast of France, the island of Jersey has been home to conquering Vikings, War of the Roses battles, and the exiled Victor Hugo. The island, a British Crown dependency, is also home to a unique culture and language: Jèrriais, similar to but distinct from French. The most delicious phrase in Jèrriais? Nièr beurre, or black butter. 

To make the regional specialty, islanders boil apples in cider until they become a sweet, slightly tangy spread, then add licorice and spices. Traditionally, communities would come together several times every autumn and winter for la séthée d'nièr beurre, or a "black butter evening," where they would cook the butter amid stories, songs, and general revelry. Nowadays, communities and private organizations often have a yearly black butter night, where they gather to peel and prepare barrels full of recently-harvested apples. L'Office du Jèrriais, the official body promoting the Jèrriais language and Jersey culture, also sponsors an annual black butter evening as a formal cultural festival, including traditional costumes and folk songs.

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