While infertility used to be considered a female problem, that’s far from the case today. In fact, difficulties conceiving are tied just as much to the male factor as they are the female with about nine percent of men affected and 11 percent of women. “Given the high frequency of male-factor infertility, it’s important to recognize that there are a number of activities that can affect a man's fertility,” says Brian Levine, M.D., founding partner and practice director of CCRM New York.

There are multiple factors that can lead to male infertility — health issues, difficulties having sex, and environmental causes, just to name a few — but luckily for men, they continue to make sperm throughout their life. That means if habits are changed, in about three months’ time, they should expect to see improvements, Levine says. (Women are born with their lifetime supply of eggs.)

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